Madame Pince and the School Library

For libraries and librarians just west of Hogwarts

The Giving Tree and The Taking Tree, A Celebration of Mother’s Day

May9

Click here for lesson plans adapted to the computer lab. 

Okay, so I’m being subversive with my lesson plans for 2nd and 3rd grade this week.  Instead of using the traditional Mother’s Day books, I’ve decided to read one that questions what we should and can ask of the women in our lives.

I like Shel Silverstein.  Don’t get me wrong.  I’ve had a copy of “Where the Sidewalk Ends” since I was in college.  It was a Christmas present from my parents when I was a student at Eastern Michigan University.  It went with me to Manhattan, moved with me to Queens and then to Brooklyn, to Manhattan again, back to Brooklyn, and finally came with me when I returned to Michigan.  Both the audio cassette and the hard cover are sitting on a shelf in my home office.

When it comes to Silverstein’s “The Giving Tree,” I am not one of the those people who get all dewey-eyed and choked up about how it speaks to me.  Just the opposite.  The book trips my gag reflex.  What’s worse, I think it gives the impression to young boys and girls that a woman’s purpose is defined by how much she gives to men and she is expected to make sacrifices until she has nothing left.  I can’t say that I think the book is misogynistic, because the boy doesn’t come off too well, either.  He’s a flighty, self-absorbed schmo who ends his days like a lump on a stump.  The only reason to put this book in a children’s library is because it’s got some pictures in it.  However, I bet you’ll be hard pressed to find a children’s section that doesn’t house at least one copy.

This week, I’m doing a conventional Venn diagram to compare and contrast “The Giving Tree” by Shel Silverstein with “The Taking Tree,” by Shrill Travesty.  I’m also introducing the concepts of “classic” literature and “parody.” (Including the meanings of the words “shrill” and “travesty.”)

Materials:

Print Friendly

Using the OPAC to Access eBooks

May1

Week 30, first taught the week of April 27, 2015

Click on the link here to access the lesson plan (based in a computer lab) to teach students how to access eBooks in the media center’s Destiny program. 

Continuing with “funny books,” today, we’ll read “The Dumb Bunnies” by Dav Pilkey.

Print Friendly
by posted under Lesson Plan | tagged under ,  |  No Comments »    

Chrysanthemum and Searching the OPAC

April20

Week 29, 3rd week of April

Click on this link for the Google document with lesson plans using “Chrysanthemum” and the springboard for a lesson on searching the library online public access catalog (OPAC).   The lesson is geared towards 1st, 2nd and 3rd grades.

Book to be read:

Print Friendly
by posted under April, Lesson Plan, Week 27 | tagged under  |  No Comments »    

Library Lingo for Elementary

February7

Grade/Teacher:

  • Harrison/Media Skills/1st, 2nd and 3rd

  • Week 21, Week of February 9, 2015

Unit/Theme:

  • General Media Skills/Harrison/Media Skills/

Standards:

American Association of School Librarians, “Standards for the 21st Century Learner:

  • 1.1.2 Use prior and background knowledge as context for new learning.

Scope and Sequence:

Dearborn Public Schools Department of Media Services, K-12 Information Literacy Media Curriculum, 2004:

  • Content Standard #1:  A student who has been educated in library media information skills access information efficiently and effectively.

Common Core State Standards:

  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.1.4

  • Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grade 1 reading and content, choosing flexibly from an array of strategies.

Lesson Objective(s):

  • Students who are becoming information literate locate fiction and nonfiction collections, know how materials are arranged on shelves, can identify parts of a book, and use library terms correctly.

Key Vocabulary (review):

  • All terms in the game have been introduced and reviewed prior to playing it

Materials:

Preparation:

  • Adaptation of content

  • Links to background

  • Links to past learning

  • Strategies incorporated

Scaffolding:

  • Modeling

  • Guided practice

  • Independent practice

  • Comprehensible input

Group Options:

  • Whole class

  • Partners

  • Independent

Integration of Processes:

  • Reading

  • Speaking

  • Listening

Application:

  • Meaningful

  • Hands-on

  • Linked to objectives

  • Promotes engagement

Assessment:

  • Individual

  • Group

  • Oral

Transition:

  • Review library terms and how to play bingo

Anticipatory Set:

  • Tell students we are going to play Library Lingo

  • Review the behavior expected for playing a game

Instruction/Check for Understanding:

  • Find a good place to keep the sheet where call out cards are placed when they have been used for each round.

  • Play as many rounds of Library Lingo as time allows.
Print Friendly

Map Skills for Elementary Students

February7

Grade/Teacher:

  • Harrison/Media Skills/1st, 2nd, and 3rd

  • Week 20, 1st week of February

Unit/Theme:

  • Reference Materials/Harrison/Media Skills/

Standards:

American Association of School Librarians, “Standards for the 21st Century Learner:

  • 1.1.1. Learners use skills, resources and tools to follow an inquiry based process in seeking knowledge in curricular subjects, and make the real world connection for using this process in own life.

Scope and Sequence:

Dearborn Public Schools Department of Media Services, K-12 Information Literacy Media Curriculum, 2004:

  • Content Standard #2: A student who has been educated in library media information skills evaluates information critically and competently.

Common Core State Standards:

  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.3.10: By the end of the year, read and comprehend informational texts, including history/social studies, science, and technical texts, at the high end of the grades 2-3 text complexity band independently and proficiently.

Lesson Objective(s):

  • Students will read maps to determine the best way to travel from one point to another.

Language Objective(s):

Michigan Department of Education, K-8 GLCE English Language Arts:

  • R.IT.03.01 identify and describe the basic elements, features, and purpose of a variety of informational genre including textbooks, encyclopedias, and magazines.

Key Vocabulary (review):

  • map

  • atlas

  • park

Materials:

Preparation:

  • Adaptation of content

  • Links to background

  • Links to past learning

  • Strategies incorporated

Scaffolding:

  • Modeling

  • Guided practice

  • Independent practice

  • Comprehensible input

Group Options:

  • Whole class

  • Partners

  • Independent

Integration of Processes:

  • Reading

  • Writing/Typing

  • Speaking

  • Listening

Application:

  • Meaningful

  • Hands-on

  • Linked to objectives

  • Promotes engagement

Assessment:

  • Individual

  • Group

  • Written

  • Oral

Transition:

  • Review the lesson from last week. [We used atlases to answer a worksheet to explore the books and learn key concepts such as guide words.]

Anticipatory Set:

  • Pass out copies of the Scholastic booklet and review the keys words.

Instruction/Check for Understanding:

  • Read through the text on page 9 and answer any questions that students have about the directions.

  • Give students 10-15 minutes to work with their table mates to answer the questions and review them as a whole group.

  • For their own maps, have students draw a picture of their house at the top of the page and their school at the bottom of the page.

  • In between the two buildings, have students draw the things they see on the way to school each morning (i.e., trees, houses, buildings, parks, etc.)

  • Tell students to provide details for their maps.

  • Review students map with the whole group.
Print Friendly

Halloween Week 2: Picture Books and Computer Skills

October23

For traditional plans using the media center and Halloween picture books, click here. 

Grade/Teacher:

  • Harrison/Media Skills/1st, 2nd and 3rd

  • Week 8, October 24

Unit/Theme:

  • Halloween/Harrison/Media Skills

Standards:

American Association of School Librarians, “Standards for the 21st Century Learner” 

Learners Use Tools, Resources, & Skills to:

  • 2, Draw conclusions, make informed decisions, apply knowledge to new situations, and create new knowlege.

  • 4, Pursue personal and aesthetic growth

Scope and Sequence:

Dearborn Public Schools Department of Media Services, K-12 Information Literacy Media Curriculum, 2004:

  • Content Standard 2: “A student who has been educated in library media information skills evaluates information critically and competently.” (Page 7, Dearborn Public Schools Department of Media Services, K-12 Information Literacy Library Media Curriculum, June 2004)

Common Core State Standards:

  • CC.4.R.I.1 Key Ideas and Details: Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.

  • CC.1.R.L.5 Craft and Structure: Explain major differences between books that tell stories and books that give information, drawing on a wide reading of a range of text types.

Lesson Objective(s):

  • Students will evaluate picture books based on theme and characterization using the district’s model, ‘The Daily 5.”

  • Students will practice logging into the computer, accessing the blog and, using mouse and typing skills, play the games suggested.

Key Vocabulary (review):

  • Rhyme

  • Rhyming words

Materials:

Preparation:

  • Adaptation of content

  • Links to background

  • Links to past learning

  • Strategies incorporated

Scaffolding:

  • Modeling

  • Guided practice

  • Independent practice

  • Comprehensible input

Group Options:

  • Whole class

  • Partners

  • Independent

Integration of Processes:

  • Reading

  • Writing/Typing

  • Speaking

  • Listening

Application:

  • Meaningful

  • Hands-on

  • Linked to objectives

  • Promotes engagement

Assessment:

  • Individual

  • Group

  • Oral

Transition:

  • Show the key vocabulary words for today and review their meanings, cover examples of rhyming pairs.

Anticipatory Set:

  • Show the front covers of the books above.

  • Indicate the elements of print: author, illustrator, title, etc.

  • Can students predict whether the text will be rhyming in any of them?  What clues can be used?  (Possible answers may center around having previously read the books or knowing about books in the series, i.e., “Arthur” and “I Know an Old Lady Who…”)

  • Review what students know about “good fit” books and how they make selections in the media center.

Instruction/Check for Understanding:

  • Read one or two of the books listed and point other whether they are rhyming or not.

  • After reading, review students’ rhyming predictions and their accuracy.

  • Pull up the blog on the teacher’s station and use the promethean board to direct students to the latest post.

  • Demonstrate how students will access the sites to practice using their mice (mouses?) and typing skills

  • Pass out cards with students’ IDs and tell students to hold on to them because they will be collected as students demonstrate their ability to control their mouse.

Print Friendly

Library Media Center Orientation, Elementary Students

September4

Title of the Lesson/Activity:         

Library media center orientation

Grade Level:

1st, 2nd and 3rd grades

Overview:                                         

Students in first grade will be introduced to the media center organization, staff, rules and procedures.  Students in 2nd and 3rd Grade will review procedures from last year.         

Central Question/ Problem:         

How can I find books that I will like to read?

Learning Objectives:                     

Students will identify patterns in the location of materials, procedures for browsing in the media center and checking books out. 

Assessment Tools:

Students will find books to check out for their use and return books that they don’t want to borrow to their appropriate place on the shelves by using sticks.

Key Concepts:                                                         

DPS Content Interpretation: Students who are becoming information literate locate the Fiction and Nonfiction collections and know how materials are arranged on shelves.

Evidence/ Sources:                                    

  • Media center
  • Circulation computer with Destiny software
  • Shelf markers (a.k.a. “Sticks”)
  • Class lists with student barcode numbers in place of library cards
  • Bookmarks
  • Picture book, “Never Let a Ghost Borrow Your Library Book”

Duration:                                                                               

45 minute class review to be conducted weekly until the majority of students are browsing and checking out books independently.

Key Vocabulary:

  • Library
  • Librarian
  • Media Center
  • Media Specialist
  • Media Secretary

Instructional Sequence:                            

Transition:

  • Write the key vocabulary words on the board and introduce or review them with students.
  • Explore connections students make to the words.
  • Show the cover of the picture books to be read.
  • Discussion: What does “book care” mean (from the subtitle of the book)?

Anticipatory Set:

  • Explain that students will begin checking out books from the media center soon and that Mrs. Malyn, the media secretary, is scheduling their classes.
  • Review/explain rules for borrowing books: Students in 2-5 grade can borrow two books each week, as long as they bring their old books back;  1st graders get one book.
  • Review/explain elements of book care (water damage, food damage, using a bookmark, keeping books in safe place they’ll remember – brainstorm ideas of good places at home and in their class)
  • Review/explain fine policy: no charge for late books, but there is a charge to repair or replace books which needs to be paid before new books can be borrowed
  • Review/explain “browsing” concept (check out time is limited-how to pick a good book based on cover clues and book location in media center)

Instruction/Check for Understanding:

  • Read “Never Let a Ghost Borrow Your Library Book.”  How can the title and cover help students when browsing to determine if they might like to read the book?
  • Before reading, introduce/review elements of print (title, author, etc.) Point out connections between the title and the cover illustrations.  What can students predict about the story they will hear by using the title and the illustration as clues.
  • Read the book.  Review predictions afterwards.
  • Demonstrate how to use the shelf markers when browsing for books.  Pass out 5 and tell students to give their shelf marker to another student when they have chosen their book(s) for check out.

Closure/Summary:

  • Pass out a book mark to each student and stress the similarities between a bookmark and a shelfmarker.  How are they similar and different?
  • In the last 5 minutes of class, introduce students to the “ABC Line Up Game.”
  • Students line up to leave the library in alphabetical order by their names, like books on the shelves.  And, like books on the shelves, they make no noise.
  • To communicate, students can use gestures.  Strikes are given for each time a student speaks.
  • The class with the fewest number of strikes when lining up wins for the week’s game.

Anticipated student conceptions or challenges to understanding:            

Explain the anticipated challenges students might face in accomplishing these objectives and tips to overcome them

Curriculum Links:

AASL Content Standard #1: A student who has been educated in library media information skills accesses information efficiently and effectively.

Common Core State Standards:

1.1.1 Follow an inquiry-based process in seeking knowledge in curricular subjects and make the real world connection for using this process in own life.

Bibliography:

Casale, Karen, and Cecilia Rebora. Never let a ghost borrow your library book: book care guidelines from the Library Secret Service. Madison, WI: UpstartBooks, 2012. Print.

Print Friendly

OPACs, Baseball and Fiction Books

April14


Week29 Baseball Fiction using the computer lab

Click on the link above for an alternate lesson plan for Week 29 which features a new book,

The Bambino and Me

and tie-ins with a computer lab.

Print Friendly

St. Patrick’s Day and Using the OPAC to Find Holiday Books

March5

Week 27

Click here to find my lesson plan that incorporates two books by Tomie dePaola with a lesson on using the library’s OPAC and its Visual Search function to find Holiday books.

The two books I use are:

DePaola, Tomie. Jamie O’Rourke and the big potato: an Irish folktale. New York: Putnam, 1992. Print.

DePaola, Tomie. Jamie O’Rourke and the pooka. New York: Putnam, 2000. Print.

If you’d like to use a more traditional lesson plan for St Pat’s day, here’s the one I wrote in 2011.

 

Print Friendly

Supporting the Scholastic Book Fair

March3

Plans for the week of March 2, 2015

Click here to download the lesson plans for this week, which have been written to support the Scholastic Book Fair scheduled in my elementary school. 

One of the things kids seem to have the most trouble with is determining what they can buy at the Book Fair, so my lessons always include a math element.  Following are two worksheets I found on the internet, if you’d like to have a written element to the lesson.  I’ve also found that most of a 45 minute class will be taken up with the DVD, a short read aloud selected from the books being sold, and reviewing where to find the price of each book or item.

This year, I am teaching in the computer lab.  After students watch the promotional video for the Book Fair, they’ll go to the computers where they’ll access my blog: http://iblog.dearbornschools.org/harrisc1/2015/03/02/how-much-have-you-got/ which has links to the digital flyers for the fair and a money game at ABCya.com.

For a more traditional route, here are some worksheets:

working with coins

identify_coins-2

 

Print Friendly

Review of OPACs and Dr. Seuss’s Birthday (Week 25)

February26

The lesson plans in the document below are for Week 24, March 3, 2014.  Classes are continuing in the computer lab using their computers to access the library’s OPAC.

You can access the Google Document version of my lesson plans, click here. 

So far, the kids in 1st, 2nd and 3rd Grade are doing well with accessing the OPAC.  What I’ve noticed is that there’s a disconnect between the Call # in the record and the location of the book on the shelves.  I’ll be focusing on that skill this week.

Because March 2 is Dr. Seuss’s birthday, I’ll use Dr. Seuss books this week:

For a more traditional lesson plan using these books, try this one from 2011

Print Friendly
« Older Entries