Madame Pince and the School Library

For libraries and librarians just west of Hogwarts

Jan Brett’s “The Hat” and Story Sequencing

January13

Week 17

Grade/Class/Subject:

  • K-2/Harrison/Media Skills

Unit/Theme:

  • Identify fiction, recognize print reading materials and read for pleasure.

Standards (American Association of School Librarians, “Standards for the 21st Century):

  • 4.1.3. Respond to literature and creative expressions of ideas in various formats and genres.

Content Objectives (Dearborn Public Schools Department of Media Services, K-12 Information Literacy Media Curriculum:

  • Content Standard #4: A student who has been educated in library media information skills and who is an independent learner pursues information related to personal interests.

Language Objectives (Michigan Department of Education, K-8 GLCE English Language Arts:

  • Kindergarten: R.AT.00.02: choose books… in their free time.
  • 1st Grade: R.AT.01.02: do substantial reading… in their free time.
  • 2nd Grade: R.AT.02.02: do substantial reading… in their free time.

Key Vocabulary:

  • Patterns
  • Prediction

Supplementary Materials:

Brett, Jan. Annie and the wild animals. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Co., 1985.

Brett, Jan. The hat. New York: Putnam, 1997. Print and digital.

Keats, Ezra Jack. The snowy day. Harmondsworth: Puffin Books, 1976.

Preparation:

  • Adaptation of content
  • Links to background
  • Links to past learning
  • Strategies incorporated

Scaffolding:

  • Modeling
  • Guided practice
  • Comprehensible input

Group Options:

  • Whole class

Integration of Processes:

  • Reading
  • Speaking
  • Listening

Application:

  • Meaningful
  • Linked to objectives
  • Promotes engagement

Assessment:

  • Group

Lesson Sequence

Transition:

  • Review what students know about patterns from their math assignments.

Anticipatory Set:

  • Review what the word “patterns” mean and how patterns help to make predictions.

Instruction/Check for Understanding:

  1. Show students the cover of “The Hat” by Jan Brett. Discuss the clues the author/illustrator uses on the cover to give readers and idea of the story.
  2. Show students the first page which begins, “Winter was on the way. Lisa took her woolen clothes out of the chest and carried them outside”. Point out the illustrations in the circular frames on either side of the page. Ask students what the items in the frames have to do with the story. (They’re items of winter clothing.)
  3. Read the next spread which begins, “She was hanging them…” And show students the pictures in the frames on either side. How are they connected with the story? (The picture on the left hand side is of a laundry basket, which reinforces the action on the full spread; Lisa is hanging laundry. The picture on the right hand page is of Hedgie the hedgehog, who hasn’t been introduced into the story yet.)
  4. Turn to the next spread and read the text. Point out the pictures on either side and the additional picture frame that now runs above the main illustration on the spread. Name the items on the laundry line for students who are sitting in the back and may not be able to see.
  5. Turn to the next spread and note that the chicken from the picture in the frame on the right had side is now a part of the story. What can they infer from this to predict what will happen with the goose in the picture to the right on this spread? What is Lisa doing in the illustration on the left.
  6. Turn to the next spread and reinforce their prediction that the goose will be in the story. Note that the gloves are now missing from the picture of the laundry line on at the top of the page and the new activity Lisa is doing in the picture on the right.
  7. Repeat step number 6 (read the text, discuss the illustrations, make predictions for the next page) until you finish the story.
  8. If students don’t have access to a computer lab, resources are available at Jan Brett’s website.  I used the Reader’s Theater script that can be found here and the coloring page that can be found here

Preview for Next Week:

  • Tell students we will read books about the next holiday next week. (Valentine’s Day).
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More Books About Snow for Elementary Students

January12

Grade/Class/Subject:

  • K-2/Harrison/Media Skills

Unit/Theme:

  • Making predictions/snow

Standards

American Association of School Librarians, “Standards for the 21st Century Learner:

  • 2, Draw conclusions, make informed decisions, apply knowledge to new situations, and create new knowledge.

Content Objectives

Dearborn Public Schools Department of Media Services, K-12 Information Literacy Media Curriculum, 2004:

  • Content Standard #4: A student who has been educated in library media information skills and who is an independent learner pursues information related to personal interests.

Language Objectives

Michigan Department of Education, K-8 GLCE English Language Arts:

  • Kindergarten: R.NT.00.04, identify how authors/illustrators use literary devices including pictures and illustrations to support the understanding of settings and characters.
  • 1st Grade: R.NT.01.04, . identify how authors/illustrators use literary devices including illustrations to support story elements and transitional words including before, after, now, and finally to indicate a sequence of events and sense of story.
  • 2nd Grade: R.NT.02.04, identify and explain howauthors/illustrators use literary devices including illustrations and titles to depict major story events, and comparisons including metaphors or similes to reveal characters’ thoughts and actions.

Key Vocabulary:

  • Cover, pictures

Supplementary Materials:

Preparation:

  • Adaptation of content
  • Links to background
  • Links to past learning
  • Strategies incorporated

Scaffolding:

  • Modeling
  • Guided practice
  • Comprehensible input

Group Options:

  • Whole class

Integration of Processes:

  • Reading
  • Speaking
  • Listening

Application:

  • Meaningful
  • Linked to objectives
  • Promotes engagement

Assessment:

  • Group
  • Oral
  • Lesson Sequence

Transition:

  • Review the different sections of the media center from last week, specifically the Easy Section, and the kinds of books students would expect to find.

Anticipatory Set:

  • Review the vocabulary words,

Instruction/Check for Understanding:

  • Tell students that it’s important for them to choose books that they think are interesting, in addition to being at their reading level.
  • Using the pictures on the front covers of the books, have students predict the stories before reading them and whether they think they would like the book if they borrowed it from the library.  Have students share their predictions with a partner.
  • Reinforce the commonalities and differences between print and digital versions of the book, “Tacky the penguin.”
  • After reading each book, review the predictions and reinforce their abilities to successfully predict elements in the story (or not).
  • Direct students to the appropriate post on “Mrs. Harrison’s blog” features penguins.
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Books About Snow and What’s the Difference Between an eBook and a Print Book?

January12

Grade/Class/Subject:

  • K-3/Harrison/Media Skills

Unit/Theme:

  • The organization of media center/snow

Standards

American Association of School Librarians, “Standards for the 21st Century Learner:

  • 1.4.1, Self Monitoring Strategies, Monitor own information-seeking processes for effectiveness and progress, and adapt as necessary.

Content Objectives

Dearborn Public Schools Department of Media Services, K-12 Information Literacy Media Curriculum, 2004:

  • Content Standard #1: A student who has been educated in library media information skills accesses information efficiently and effectively.

Language Objectives

Michigan Department of Education, K-8 GLCE English Language Arts:

  • Kindergarten: R.CM.00.03, “begin to make connections across texts by making meaningful predictions based on illustrations or portions of texts.”
  • 1st Grade: R.CM.01.03, compare and contrast relationships among characters, events, and key ideas within and across texts to create a deeper understanding by mapping story elements, graphically representing key ideas and details, and asking questions as they read.
  • 2nd Grade: R.CM.02.03, see details above for 1st grade (the description is similar)
  • 3rd Grade: R.CM.03.03, see details above for 1st grade (the description is similar)

Key Vocabulary:

  • Review: Spine label, Alphabet, Alphabetizing

Supplementary Materials:

Preparation:

  • Links to background
  • Links to past learning
  • Strategies incorporated

Scaffolding:

  • Modeling
  • Guided practice

Group Options:

  • Whole class

Integration of Processes:

  • Reading
  • Speaking
  • Listening

Application:

  • Meaningful
  • Linked to objectives
  • Promotes engagement

Assessment:

  • Group
  • Lesson Sequence

Transition:

  • Review what students remember about the organization of the media center. Review elements of the cover and spine. Review the key vocabulary words and apply their meanings to the media center.

Anticipatory Set:

  • Point out the letters on the spine of the books in the media center.
  • What information is available on the spine label?

Instruction/Check for Understanding:

  • Read the books and interject questions to promote listening.
  • After reading each book, ask students to identify the section of the media center in which they would find the book (i.e., Easy, Fiction, Nonfiction) and what letters go on the spine for the author’s last name.

Preview for Next Week:

  • Tell students we will read more books about winter next week.
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Locating Materials in the Media Center and Christmas Books for Lower Elementary Grades

November22

Computer games associated with the lesson:

Mrs. Lodge’s Library http://www.mrs-lodges-library.com/shelver/

ABCya Christmas Word Search http://www.abcya.com/christmas_word_search.htm

Subject/Grade

  • Media Skills, Kindergarten – 3rd Grade

Unit/Themes:

  • Locating materials in the media center/Christmas

Standards:

  • AASL 4.1.3

Scope and Sequence:

  • The student who is information literate uses information accurately and creatively.

Content Objective(s):

  • Students will respond to literature and creative expressions of ideas in various formats and genres.

Language Objective(s):

  • Students will express feelings about characters and events in a story.
  • Students will make connections between literature and their own experiences.

Key Vocabulary:

  • Review: spine label, holiday
  • Introduce: Christmas, Alphabet, Alphabetizing

Materials:

Denim, Sue, and Dav Pilkey. The Dumb Bunnies’ Easter. New York: Blue Sky Press, 1995.

Marshall, James. Merry Christmas, space case. New York: Dial Books for Young Readers, 1986.

McCoy, Glenn. I see Santa everywhere. New York, N.Y.: Hyperion Books for Children, 2008.

McGinley, Phyllis, and Kurt Werth. The year without a Santa Claus. Philadelphia: J. B. Lippincott Company, 1957.

Preparation:

  • Links to background
  • Links to past learning
  • Strategies incorporated

Scaffolding:

  • Modeling
  • Guided practice

Group Options:

  • Whole class

Integration of Processes:

  • Reading
  • Speaking
  • Listening

Application:

  • Hands-on
  • Meaningful
  • Linked to objectives
  • Promotes engagement

Assessment:

  • Group
  • Oral

Lesson Sequence:

Transition:

  • Review what students remember about the organization of the media center (fiction, nonfiction sections, etc.) Review why students use browsing sticks.  Point out the letters on the spinces and the Christmas sticker on each book.

Anticipatory Set:

  • Write the new and review vocabulary words on the board.
  • Word through what the new words mean.
  • How do the words apply to the library?
  • Ask students if they can look at a book and tell where it belongs.  What’s the fastest way to do this? (Answer: read the spine label.)

Instruction/Check for Understanding:

  • Read the books above and interject questions to promote active listening.

Preview for Next Week:

  • Tell students we’ll read more Christmas books next week.
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Lesson Plan: Week 1, September

September1

Grade/Class/Subject:

Media Skills, 1-3 grade

Unit/Theme:

Introduction to the library

Language Objectives:

Students will use library terms appropriately.

Key Vocabulary:

  • Library
  • Media Center
  • Librarian
  • Media Secretary
  • Mrs. Harrison
  • Mrs. Wszola

Supplemental Materials:

  • Links to background
  • Links to past learning
  • Strategies incorporated

Scaffolding:

  • Modeling
  • Guided Practice

Group Options:

  • Whole class (1st – 3rd)

Integration of Processes:

  • Reading
  • Speaking
  • Listening

Application:

  • Meaningful
  • Linked to objectives
  • Promotes engagement

Assessment:

  • Group
  • Oral

Lesson Sequence:

  • Pull up to 9 chairs and place them around the perimeter of the class meeting area.
    • When class enters, direct them to sit on the carpet. After everyone is seated on the floor, choose one student who has entered following the directions (usually to enter quickly and quickly choose a seat next to someone who is a good choice for them) and ask if they would like to sit on a chair.
    • Tell students that the chairs are for students who are “caught” following directions, it’s like the game of tag; that if a student asks for a chair, the teacher has to say no.
  • Introduce the three rules for media class and explain the reasons for each:
    • Sit “criss cross” or “like a pretzel”
    • Keep your hands and feet to yourself
    • Raise your hand and wait to be called on if you want to talk
  • Write the vocabulary words (above) on the board and review their meanings.  Introduce the new words and ask students what the words mean.   Correct any misunderstandings.  Explore connects that students make.
  • Show the cover of each book and review elements of the cover (title, author, etc.).  Point out the connect between the title and the illustration.  What can they predict about the story using these elements?
  • Read the books.  Review predictions afterwards and gauge accuracies.
  • Line up students in alphabetical order.

Preview for Next Week:

Discuss what the difference between buying and borrowing books.  Why is it important to take of things that are borrowed?

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Arthur for Valentine’s Day, eBook and Video

January26

1st, 2nd, 3rd Grades/Media Skills:

Unit/Theme:

  • Arthur for Valentine’s Day, eBook and Video

Standards

American Association of School Librarians, Standards for the 21st Century Learner:

  • 1.1.6 Read, view, and listen for information presented in any format (e.g., textual, visual, media, digital) in order to make inferences and gather meaning.

Content Objectives

Dearborn Public Schools Department of Media Services, K-12 Information Literacy Media Curriculum, 2004:

  • Content Standard #3: A student who has been educated in library media information skills uses information accurately and creatively.

Language Objectives

Michigan Department of Education, K-8 GLCE English Language Arts:

  • 1st Grade: 1. Ask and answer questions about key details in a text.
  • 2nd Grade: 1. Ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why, and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text.
  • 3rd Grade: 3. Describe characters in a story (e.g., their traits, motivations, or feelings) and explain how their actions contribute to the sequence of events.

Key Vocabulary:

  • eBook
  • Promethean Board
  • DVD

Supplementary Materials:

Preparation:

  • Adaptation of content
  • Links to background
  • Links to past learning
  • Strategies incorporated

Scaffolding:

  • Modeling
  • Guided practice
  • Comprehensible input

Group Options:

  • Whole class

Integration of Processes:

  • Reading
  • Writing
  • Speaking
  • Listening

Application:

  • Meaningful
  • Linked to objectives
  • Promotes engagement

Assessment:

  • Group
  • Oral
  • Lesson Sequence

Transition:

  • Review vocabulary.

Anticipatory Set:

  • Review procedures for reading an eBook on the Promethean Board. Review descriptive words that the author uses.

Instruction/Check for Understanding:

  • Read “Arthur’s Valentine” and point out clues in the text for how to read the book aloud.
  • Show “Arthur and the Square Dance.”
  • After reading the book and seeing the video, discuss how the characters are similar and different from one medium to the other.

Preview for Next Week:

  • Tell students we will be in the computer lab next week and will start to work on using the library database..
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Using the OPAC to Access eBooks

May1

Week 30, first taught the week of April 27, 2015

Click on the link here to access the lesson plan (based in a computer lab) to teach students how to access eBooks in the media center’s Destiny program. 

Continuing with “funny books,” today, we’ll read “The Dumb Bunnies” by Dav Pilkey.

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Chrysanthemum and Searching the OPAC

April20

Week 29, 3rd week of April

Click on this link for the Google document with lesson plans using “Chrysanthemum” and the springboard for a lesson on searching the library online public access catalog (OPAC).   The lesson is geared towards 1st, 2nd and 3rd grades.

Book to be read:

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Library Lingo for Elementary

February7

Grade/Teacher:

  • Harrison/Media Skills/1st, 2nd and 3rd

  • Week 21, Week of February 9, 2015

Unit/Theme:

  • General Media Skills/Harrison/Media Skills/

Standards:

American Association of School Librarians, “Standards for the 21st Century Learner:

  • 1.1.2 Use prior and background knowledge as context for new learning.

Scope and Sequence:

Dearborn Public Schools Department of Media Services, K-12 Information Literacy Media Curriculum, 2004:

  • Content Standard #1:  A student who has been educated in library media information skills access information efficiently and effectively.

Common Core State Standards:

  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.1.4

  • Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grade 1 reading and content, choosing flexibly from an array of strategies.

Lesson Objective(s):

  • Students who are becoming information literate locate fiction and nonfiction collections, know how materials are arranged on shelves, can identify parts of a book, and use library terms correctly.

Key Vocabulary (review):

  • All terms in the game have been introduced and reviewed prior to playing it

Materials:

Preparation:

  • Adaptation of content

  • Links to background

  • Links to past learning

  • Strategies incorporated

Scaffolding:

  • Modeling

  • Guided practice

  • Independent practice

  • Comprehensible input

Group Options:

  • Whole class

  • Partners

  • Independent

Integration of Processes:

  • Reading

  • Speaking

  • Listening

Application:

  • Meaningful

  • Hands-on

  • Linked to objectives

  • Promotes engagement

Assessment:

  • Individual

  • Group

  • Oral

Transition:

  • Review library terms and how to play bingo

Anticipatory Set:

  • Tell students we are going to play Library Lingo

  • Review the behavior expected for playing a game

Instruction/Check for Understanding:

  • Find a good place to keep the sheet where call out cards are placed when they have been used for each round.

  • Play as many rounds of Library Lingo as time allows.
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Map Skills for Elementary Students

February7

Grade/Teacher:

  • Harrison/Media Skills/1st, 2nd, and 3rd

  • Week 20, 1st week of February

Unit/Theme:

  • Reference Materials/Harrison/Media Skills/

Standards:

American Association of School Librarians, “Standards for the 21st Century Learner:

  • 1.1.1. Learners use skills, resources and tools to follow an inquiry based process in seeking knowledge in curricular subjects, and make the real world connection for using this process in own life.

Scope and Sequence:

Dearborn Public Schools Department of Media Services, K-12 Information Literacy Media Curriculum, 2004:

  • Content Standard #2: A student who has been educated in library media information skills evaluates information critically and competently.

Common Core State Standards:

  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.3.10: By the end of the year, read and comprehend informational texts, including history/social studies, science, and technical texts, at the high end of the grades 2-3 text complexity band independently and proficiently.

Lesson Objective(s):

  • Students will read maps to determine the best way to travel from one point to another.

Language Objective(s):

Michigan Department of Education, K-8 GLCE English Language Arts:

  • R.IT.03.01 identify and describe the basic elements, features, and purpose of a variety of informational genre including textbooks, encyclopedias, and magazines.

Key Vocabulary (review):

  • map

  • atlas

  • park

Materials:

Preparation:

  • Adaptation of content

  • Links to background

  • Links to past learning

  • Strategies incorporated

Scaffolding:

  • Modeling

  • Guided practice

  • Independent practice

  • Comprehensible input

Group Options:

  • Whole class

  • Partners

  • Independent

Integration of Processes:

  • Reading

  • Writing/Typing

  • Speaking

  • Listening

Application:

  • Meaningful

  • Hands-on

  • Linked to objectives

  • Promotes engagement

Assessment:

  • Individual

  • Group

  • Written

  • Oral

Transition:

  • Review the lesson from last week. [We used atlases to answer a worksheet to explore the books and learn key concepts such as guide words.]

Anticipatory Set:

  • Pass out copies of the Scholastic booklet and review the keys words.

Instruction/Check for Understanding:

  • Read through the text on page 9 and answer any questions that students have about the directions.

  • Give students 10-15 minutes to work with their table mates to answer the questions and review them as a whole group.

  • For their own maps, have students draw a picture of their house at the top of the page and their school at the bottom of the page.

  • In between the two buildings, have students draw the things they see on the way to school each morning (i.e., trees, houses, buildings, parks, etc.)

  • Tell students to provide details for their maps.

  • Review students map with the whole group.
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Halloween Picture Books and Computer Skills

October23

For traditional plans using the media center and Halloween picture books, click here. 

Grade/Teacher:

  • Harrison/Media Skills/1st, 2nd and 3rd

  • Week of October 24

Unit/Theme:

  • Halloween/Harrison/Media Skills

Standards:

American Association of School Librarians, “Standards for the 21st Century Learner” 

Learners Use Tools, Resources, & Skills to:

  • 2, Draw conclusions, make informed decisions, apply knowledge to new situations, and create new knowlege.

  • 4, Pursue personal and aesthetic growth

Scope and Sequence:

Dearborn Public Schools Department of Media Services, K-12 Information Literacy Media Curriculum, 2004:

  • Content Standard 2: “A student who has been educated in library media information skills evaluates information critically and competently.” (Page 7, Dearborn Public Schools Department of Media Services, K-12 Information Literacy Library Media Curriculum, June 2004)

Common Core State Standards:

  • CC.4.R.I.1 Key Ideas and Details: Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.

  • CC.1.R.L.5 Craft and Structure: Explain major differences between books that tell stories and books that give information, drawing on a wide reading of a range of text types.

Lesson Objective(s):

  • Students will evaluate picture books based on theme and characterization using the district’s model, ‘The Daily 5.”

  • Students will practice logging into the computer, accessing the blog and, using mouse and typing skills, play the games suggested.

Key Vocabulary (review):

  • Rhyme

  • Rhyming words

Materials:

Preparation:

  • Adaptation of content

  • Links to background

  • Links to past learning

  • Strategies incorporated

Scaffolding:

  • Modeling

  • Guided practice

  • Independent practice

  • Comprehensible input

Group Options:

  • Whole class

  • Partners

  • Independent

Integration of Processes:

  • Reading

  • Writing/Typing

  • Speaking

  • Listening

Application:

  • Meaningful

  • Hands-on

  • Linked to objectives

  • Promotes engagement

Assessment:

  • Individual

  • Group

  • Oral

Transition:

  • Show the key vocabulary words for today and review their meanings, cover examples of rhyming pairs.

Anticipatory Set:

  • Show the front covers of the books above.

  • Indicate the elements of print: author, illustrator, title, etc.

  • Can students predict whether the text will be rhyming in any of them?  What clues can be used?  (Possible answers may center around having previously read the books or knowing about books in the series, i.e., “Arthur” and “I Know an Old Lady Who…”)

  • Review what students know about “good fit” books and how they make selections in the media center.

Instruction/Check for Understanding:

  • Read one or two of the books listed and point other whether they are rhyming or not.

  • After reading, review students’ rhyming predictions and their accuracy.

  • Pull up the blog on the teacher’s station and use the promethean board to direct students to the latest post.

  • Demonstrate how students will access the sites to practice using their mice (mouses?) and typing skills

  • Pass out cards with students’ IDs and tell students to hold on to them because they will be collected as students demonstrate their ability to control their mouse.

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Library Media Center Orientation, Elementary Students

September4

Title of the Lesson/Activity:         

Library media center orientation

Grade Level:

1st, 2nd and 3rd grades

Overview:                                         

Students in first grade will be introduced to the media center organization, staff, rules and procedures.  Students in 2nd and 3rd Grade will review procedures from last year.         

Central Question/ Problem:         

How can I find books that I will like to read?

Learning Objectives:                     

Students will identify patterns in the location of materials, procedures for browsing in the media center and checking books out. 

Assessment Tools:

Students will find books to check out for their use and return books that they don’t want to borrow to their appropriate place on the shelves by using sticks.

Key Concepts:                                                         

DPS Content Interpretation: Students who are becoming information literate locate the Fiction and Nonfiction collections and know how materials are arranged on shelves.

Evidence/ Sources:                                    

  • Media center
  • Circulation computer with Destiny software
  • Shelf markers (a.k.a. “Sticks”)
  • Class lists with student barcode numbers in place of library cards
  • Bookmarks
  • Picture book, “Never Let a Ghost Borrow Your Library Book”

Duration:                                                                               

45 minute class review to be conducted weekly until the majority of students are browsing and checking out books independently.

Key Vocabulary:

  • Library
  • Librarian
  • Media Center
  • Media Specialist
  • Media Secretary

Instructional Sequence:                            

Transition:

  • Write the key vocabulary words on the board and introduce or review them with students.
  • Explore connections students make to the words.
  • Show the cover of the picture books to be read.
  • Discussion: What does “book care” mean (from the subtitle of the book)?

Anticipatory Set:

  • Explain that students will begin checking out books from the media center soon and that Mrs. Malyn, the media secretary, is scheduling their classes.
  • Review/explain rules for borrowing books: Students in 2-5 grade can borrow two books each week, as long as they bring their old books back;  1st graders get one book.
  • Review/explain elements of book care (water damage, food damage, using a bookmark, keeping books in safe place they’ll remember – brainstorm ideas of good places at home and in their class)
  • Review/explain fine policy: no charge for late books, but there is a charge to repair or replace books which needs to be paid before new books can be borrowed
  • Review/explain “browsing” concept (check out time is limited-how to pick a good book based on cover clues and book location in media center)

Instruction/Check for Understanding:

  • Read “Never Let a Ghost Borrow Your Library Book.”  How can the title and cover help students when browsing to determine if they might like to read the book?
  • Before reading, introduce/review elements of print (title, author, etc.) Point out connections between the title and the cover illustrations.  What can students predict about the story they will hear by using the title and the illustration as clues.
  • Read the book.  Review predictions afterwards.
  • Demonstrate how to use the shelf markers when browsing for books.  Pass out 5 and tell students to give their shelf marker to another student when they have chosen their book(s) for check out.

Closure/Summary:

  • Pass out a book mark to each student and stress the similarities between a bookmark and a shelfmarker.  How are they similar and different?
  • In the last 5 minutes of class, introduce students to the “ABC Line Up Game.”
  • Students line up to leave the library in alphabetical order by their names, like books on the shelves.  And, like books on the shelves, they make no noise.
  • To communicate, students can use gestures.  Strikes are given for each time a student speaks.
  • The class with the fewest number of strikes when lining up wins for the week’s game.

Anticipated student conceptions or challenges to understanding:            

Explain the anticipated challenges students might face in accomplishing these objectives and tips to overcome them

Curriculum Links:

AASL Content Standard #1: A student who has been educated in library media information skills accesses information efficiently and effectively.

Common Core State Standards:

1.1.1 Follow an inquiry-based process in seeking knowledge in curricular subjects and make the real world connection for using this process in own life.

Bibliography:

Casale, Karen, and Cecilia Rebora. Never let a ghost borrow your library book: book care guidelines from the Library Secret Service. Madison, WI: UpstartBooks, 2012. Print.

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OPACs, Baseball and Fiction Books

April14


Week29 Baseball Fiction using the computer lab

Click on the link above for an alternate lesson plan for Week 29 which features a new book,

The Bambino and Me

and tie-ins with a computer lab.

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St. Patrick’s Day and Using the OPAC to Find Holiday Books

March5

Week 27

Click here to find my lesson plan that incorporates two books by Tomie dePaola with a lesson on using the library’s OPAC and its Visual Search function to find Holiday books.

The two books I use are:

DePaola, Tomie. Jamie O’Rourke and the big potato: an Irish folktale. New York: Putnam, 1992. Print.

DePaola, Tomie. Jamie O’Rourke and the pooka. New York: Putnam, 2000. Print.

If you’d like to use a more traditional lesson plan for St Pat’s day, here’s the one I wrote in 2011.

 

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