Madame Pince and the School Library

For libraries and librarians just west of Hogwarts

Goldilocks, The Dumb Bunnies, and Goodnight Moon: Week 33, Week of May 16, 2011

May15

Grade/Class/Subject:

  • K-2/Harrison/Media Skills

Unit/Theme:

  • Humor/Parody

Standards:

American Association of School Librarians, Standards for the 21st Century Learner:

  • Draw conclusions, make informed decisions, apply knowledge to new siutations, and create new knowledge.

Content Objectives

Dearborn Public Schools Department of Media Services, K-12 Information Literacy Media Curriculum, 2004:

  • Content Standard #4: A student who has been educated in library media information skills and who is an independent learner pursues information related to personal interests.

Language Objectives

Michigan Department of Education, K-8 GLCE English Language Arts:

  • R.CM.[00].01 begin to make text-to-self and text-to-text connections and comparisons by activating prior knowledge and connecting personal knowledge and experience to ideas in text through oral and written responses.

Key Vocabulary:

  • Review: classic, humor, parody; New: Goldilocks (break it down, goldi+locks)

Supplementary Materials:

Preparation:

  • Adaptation of content
  • Links to background
  • Links to past learning
  • Strategies incorporated

Scaffolding:

  • Modeling
  • Guided practice
  • Comprehensible input

Group Options:

  • Whole class

Integration of Processes:

  • Reading
  • Speaking
  • Listening

Application:

  • Meaningful
  • Linked to objectives
  • Promotes engagement

Assessment:

  • Group
  • Oral
  • Lesson Sequence

Transition:

  • Review what students remember about classic literature and parodies.

Anticipatory Set:

  • Review the reading strategy of parsing words. Break down the name, Goldilocks.

Instruction/Check for Understanding:

  • Use the picture from Brett’s “Goldilocks and the Three Bears” to prompt students as they retell the story. Ask questions to reinforce the four characters and the plot.
  • Read “The Dumb Bunnies” and ask questions to prompt students to note how Pilkey has used the basic outline of the fairy tale for his story. How is it different? Why is it funny?
  • Ask students if humor is only something that you hear, or can something be visually funny? Show the covers of “Goodnight Moon” and “The Dumb Bunnies.” How are they similar? Read to the spread from “Goodnight Moon” which is used as the model for the cover of the Dumb Bunnies book. What was Pilkey doing in his illustration?

Preview for Next Week:

  • 2nd Grade: Tell students we will read books celebrating Earth Day next week.
  • K-1: Tell students we will read more books by Dav Pilkey next week.

The Giving Tree and The Taking Tree, A Celebration of Mother’s Day

May9

Click here for lesson plans adapted to the computer lab. 

Okay, so I’m being subversive with my lesson plans for 2nd and 3rd grade this week.  Instead of using the traditional Mother’s Day books, I’ve decided to read one that questions what we should and can ask of the women in our lives.

I like Shel Silverstein.  Don’t get me wrong.  I’ve had a copy of “Where the Sidewalk Ends” since I was in college.  It was a Christmas present from my parents when I was a student at Eastern Michigan University.  It went with me to Manhattan, moved with me to Queens and then to Brooklyn, to Manhattan again, back to Brooklyn, and finally came with me when I returned to Michigan.  Both the audio cassette and the hard cover are sitting on a shelf in my home office.

But when it comes to Silverstein’s “The Giving Tree,” I am not one of the those people who get all dewey-eyed and choked up about how it speaks to me.  Just the opposite.  The book trips my gag reflex.  What’s worse, I think it gives the impression to young boys and girls that a woman’s purpose is defined by how much she gives to men and she is expected to make sacrifices until she has nothing left.  I can’t say that I think the book is misogynistic, because the boy doesn’t come off too well, either.  He’s a flighty, self-absorbed schmo who ends his days like a lump on a stump.  The only reason to put this book in a children’s library is because it’s got some pictures in it.  However, I bet you’ll be hard pressed to find a children’s section that doesn’t house at least one copy.

This week, I’m doing a conventional Venn diagram to compare and contrast “The Giving Tree” by Shel Silverstein with “The Taking Tree,” by Shrill Travesty.  I’m also introducing the concepts of “classic” literature and “parody.” (Including the meanings of the words “shrill” and “travesty.”

Materials:

Julius the Baby of the World and Humor

May4

For printer-friendly plans that have been adapted for a computer lab, click here. 

Week 30, 1st used the Week of April 25, 2011

Grade/Class/Subject:

  • K-3/Harrison/Media Skills

Unit/Theme:

  • Literature Patterns, Humor

Standards

American Association of School Librarians, Standards for the 21st Century Learner:

  • 1.2. Draw conclusions, make informed decisions, apply knowledge to new siutations, and create new knowledge.

Content Objectives

Dearborn Public Schools Department of Media Services, K-12 Information Literacy Media Curriculum, 2004:

  • Content Standard #2: A student who has been educated in library media information skills evaluates information critically and competently.

Language Objectives

Michigan Department of Education, K-8 GLCE English Language Arts:

  • Narrative Text: R.NT.[00].05 respond to individual and multiple texts by finding evidence, discussing, illustrating, and/or writing to reflect, make meaning, and make connections.

Key Vocabulary:

  • Search, Humor, Patterns

Supplementary Materials:

Preparation:

  • Adaptation of content
  • Links to background
  • Links to past learning
  • Strategies incorporated

Scaffolding:

  • Modeling
  • Guided practice
  • Comprehensible input

Group Options:

  • Whole class

Integration of Processes:

  • Reading
  • Speaking
  • Listening

Application:

  • Meaningful
  • Linked to objectives
  • Promotes engagement

Assessment:

  • Group
  • Oral
  • Lesson Sequence

Transition:

  • Review the words “pattern” and “patterns.” Review what patterns are (students usually give examples of shapes and colors). Discuss whether patterns can be in a story.

Anticipatory Set:

  • Review the word “search,” especially when using an OPAC. Tell students librarians are often asked to recommend “funny books.” Ask them to define “funny.” (This will be hard.) Tie up discussion with the library word for “funny,” “humor,” and tell them that this is a word they should use when looking in the OPAC for a funny book.

Instruction/Check for Understanding:

  • Review of the elements of print with “Julius, the baby of the world.” As the story progresses, point out the repetition and how this creates a pattern. How does the pattern help define Lily’s character?
  • After reading the story discuss what made it funny. Point out that some members of the class thought the story was quite humorous and others didn’t agree. Stress that personal choice is part of what makes a book good for one person and not so much for another.
  • If there’s time, read one or both of the “Sam” books.

Preview for Next Week:

  • Tell students we will read books about Mothers next week.

Spring Training: Week 29

April6

I usually show a video the week we go on a break, so here are the plans for the week of April 14, 2014, Spring Break Eve.

Grade/Class/Subject:

  • Spring for Sports/Harrison/Media Skills

Unit/Theme:

  • Finding books about sports in the media center

Standards

American Association of School Librarians, “Standards for the 21st Century Learner:

  • 1.1.6, Read, view, and listen for information presented in any format… in order to make inferences and gather meaning.

Content Objectives

Dearborn Public Schools Department of Media Services, K-12 Information Literacy Media Curriculum, 2004:

  • Students will identify appropriate human, print, technological and electronic resources to access information

Language Objectives

Michigan Department of Education, K-8 GLCE English Language Arts:

  • R.NT.[xx].05 respond to individual and multiple texts by finding evidence, discussing, illustrating, and/or writing to reflect, make meaning, and make connections.

Key Vocabulary:

  • Review: DVDs, media
  • New: Sports, baseball

Supplementary Materials:


  • Arthur the Good Sport. Dir. Paul Higgins. Perf. Melissa Altro, Jodie Resther, Daniel Brochu. Sony Wonder (Video), 2002.

  • Peanuts – Lucy Must Be Traded, Charlie Brown. Dir. Sam Jaimes. Perf. Travis Boles, John Christian Graas, Gregory Grudt. Paramount, 1966.

  • Snoopy Double Feature Vol. 8 (Charlie Brown’s All-Stars/It’s Spring Training, Charlie Brown) [VHS]. Dir. Sam Jaimes. Perf. Travis Boles, John Christian Graas, Gregory Grudt. Paramount, 1997.

  • The Magic School Bus – Super Sports Fun. Dir. Larry Jacobs. Perf. Lily Tomlin, Daniel DeSanto, Erica Luttrell. Warner Home Video, 2004.

Preparation:

  • Adaptation of content
  • Links to background
  • Links to past learning
  • Strategies incorporated

Scaffolding:

  • Modeling
  • Comprehensible input

Group Options:

  • Whole class

Integration of Processes:

  • Speaking
  • Listening

Application:

  • Meaningful
  • Linked to objectives
  • Promotes engagement

Assessment:

  • Group
  • Oral

Transition:

  • Review the nonfiction section of the media center and what kinds of books can be found there.

Anticipatory Set:

  • Show students books from the sports section of the library (796), specifically books about baseball. Point out the numbers on the spine label of each book.

Instruction/Check for Understanding:

  • Review what students remember about being good audience members. Review the procedures for watching a movie: Sitting still, no talking.
  • Show the class one of the videos above. Kindergarten: Arthur, 1st and 2nd: Peanuts, and 3rd: Magic School Bus.

Preview for Next Week:

  • Tell students we will read more books after Spring Break next week.

OPACs, Baseball and Fiction Books

April14


Week29 Baseball Fiction using the computer lab

Click on the link above for an alternate lesson plan for Week 29 which features a new book,

The Bambino and Me

and tie-ins with a computer lab.

St. Patrick’s Day and Using the OPAC to Find Holiday Books

March5

Week 27

Click here to find my lesson plan that incorporates two books by Tomie dePaola with a lesson on using the library’s OPAC and its Visual Search function to find Holiday books.

The two books I use are:

DePaola, Tomie. Jamie O’Rourke and the big potato: an Irish folktale. New York: Putnam, 1992. Print.

DePaola, Tomie. Jamie O’Rourke and the pooka. New York: Putnam, 2000. Print.

If you’d like to use a more traditional lesson plan for St Pat’s day, here’s the one I wrote in 2011.

 

Supporting the Scholastic Book Fair

March3

Click here to download the lesson plans for this week, which have been written to support the Scholastic Book Fair scheduled in my elementary school. 

One of the things kids seem to have the most trouble with is determining what they can buy at the Book Fair, so my lessons always include a math element.  Following are two worksheets I found on the internet, if you’d like to have a written element to the lesson.  I’ve also found that most of a 45 minute class will be taken up with the DVD, a short read aloud selected from the books being sold, and reviewing where to find the price of each book or item.

working with coins

identify_coins-2

 

Review of OPACs and Dr. Seuss’s Birthday (Week 25)

February26

The lesson plans in the document below are for Week 24, March 3, 2014.  Classes are continuing in the computer lab using their computers to access the library’s OPAC.

You can access the Google Document version of my lesson plans, click here. 

So far, the kids in 1st, 2nd and 3rd Grade are doing well with accessing the OPAC.  What I’ve noticed is that there’s a disconnect between the Call # in the record and the location of the book on the shelves.  I’ll be focusing on that skill this week.

Because March 2 is Dr. Seuss’s birthday, I’ll use Dr. Seuss books this week:

For a more traditional lesson plan using these books, try this one from 2011

Using OPACs

February24

One thing I’ve not cared for with Edublogs is the way that postings print.  I’ve decided to use Google Docs for my lesson plans.  Click on the link below to go to a SIOP version of the weeks plan, which focuses on using the computer lab to reinforce logging into computers and databases and searching databases for information.  Since I’m new to Google Docs, please let me know if you have problems accessing the document.

WEEK 23: Using OPACs (review and an added search step) Click here for the lesson plan using Google Docs Documents

Materials needed:

  • class set of computers
  • Promethean or other Smart Board to model steps to access the OPAC
  • Google Presentation Document with Key Vocabulary and the day’s assignment 
  • Copy of the books to be read today:



 

 

Reflecting on “Arthur’s Best School Days”

February12

I’ve been showing “Arthur’s Best School Days”  as a Valentine’s Day reward for several years.  The first episode is “Arthur and the Square Dance.”  Arthur and Francine’s friends are certain that they are in love with each other.  It works well with lower elementary kids and their cooties fear.

This year, I let the DVD run through until the last episode, “Buster Hits the Books,” which ended up being the one that kids responded to most.  Buster has been watching movies and writing about them when he needs to write a book report for school.  Buster doesn’t like reading and can’t make it through the books that his friends recommend.  They keep dumbing down their suggestions until he’s left with a boring picture book.  But he’s also borrowed Arthur’s copy of Robin Hood, which Arthur tells him he might be able to read with some practice.  As it happens, Buster nearly finishes Robin Hood in one night because he loves the plot.  It turns out, he can read but he’s been bored by the books he’s gotten in the past.

After showing the DVD, classes and I discussed what to look for when they come to the media center and select their books.  I told them I have books in my house that I thought I would like, but once I started reading them, I discovered I didn’t care for them.  Those poor big eyed kids.  I told them everyone was like Buster: there are books for each of us that we won’t want to read and it’s important to pick subjects that we like when we have the option.   I don’t think they’ve heard that enough.  This is especially sad when, as educators, we know that reading comprehension scores increase when students read subjects they find interesting.

by posted under Lesson Plan | No Comments »    

Introduction to Keyboarding in the Library Media Center

November22

Grade/Teacher:

  • 1st – 3rd/Harrison

Unit/Theme:

  • Keyboarding

Standards:

  • (CCSS Speaking and Listening, all grades) Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about grade 1 topics and texts with peers and adults in small and larger groups.

  • (CCSS Writing, grade 3) With guidance and support from adults, use technology to produce and publish writing (using keyboarding skills) as well as to interact and collaborate with others.

Lesson Objective(s):

  • Students will be introduced to basic keyboarding terms and skills.

Language Objective(s):

  • Students’ listening and speaking skills will be reinforced.

  • Students will correctly use the terms introduced today.

Key Vocabulary:

  • Keyboarding (Keys are the things you touch to make letters.  They are arranged on a board. This is a “keyboard” and when you use it, you are “keyboarding.”)
  • Touch typing (Typing is another term for “keyboarding.”  Notice it is called “touch typing” not “pound typing.”)
  • ID (Short for “identification.”  When you type this in you are “identifying” yourself on the computer.)
  • Password (Passwords prove that you are really who you say you are.  They keep you and your information safe.) 

Materials:

Preparation:

  • Adaptation of content

  • Links to background

  • Links to past learning

  • Strategies incorporated

Scaffolding:

  • Modeling

  • Guided practice

  • Independent practice

  • Comprehensible input

Group Options:

  • Whole class

  • Independent

Integration of Processes:

  • Reading

  • Writing

  • Speaking

  • Listening

Application:

  • Hands-on

  • Meaningful

  • Linked to objectives

  • Promotes engagement

Assessment:

  • Individual

  • Group

  • Written

  • Oral

Transition:

  • Put the key vocabulary words on the board 
  • Ask students if they are familiar with any of them or know what they mean
  • Ask students to break down the words/terms for any clues about their meaning
  • Ask students who are familiar with the words/terms when they would use them

Anticipatory Set:

Tell students that we will be moving to a new unit today and that the terms are important but first we’ll read about a family that uses words and expressions in very interesting ways.

Instruction/Check for Understanding:

  • Read “The Dumb Bunnies’ Easter” and point out when the Bunnies literally use a term or word.
  • Use the Promethean Board to show students how to access the Typing Web (http://www.typingweb.com/tutor) program from the blog.  Note, this URL is for student logins and is different from the portal for teachers)
  • Show students how to log in with their student number and password (the PW is different from their computer login; reinforce that they should NOT click on the box to save their information) 
  • Show students the list of Beginner exercises that comes up after logging.  
  • Tell students to click on the first one, “The Home Row Keys.” 
  • Point out the pattern of the letters and the need to hit the “enter” or “return” key at the end of the first line.  Also, when a wrong key is hit, the cursor doesn’t advance until you type the right letter.  Also point out the need to hit the space bar to move the cursor through the blank space.
  • Tell students that speed is not important now, it’s more important to type the right keys.  Students should try to have a 50% accuracy rating.  Let students know that their scores are saved in their record. 

Closure/Summary:

  • Five minutes before the end of class, have students report their experiences.

Movies Are Fiction Or Nonfiction, Too

November21

Week 12, November 26, 2013

Grade/Class/Subject:

1-3/Harrison/Media Skills

Unit/Theme:

Fiction or Nonfiction/Media

Standards (AASL):

AASL 4.1.3

Content Objectives (Dearborn Public Schools Department of Media Services, K-12 Information Literacy Media Curriculum, 2004):

Students will respond to literature and creative expressions of ideas in various formats and genres.

Common Core Standards:

Speaking & Listening/Comprehension and Collaboration (SL.1 and SL.3 for grades 1-3)

Key Vocabulary (Review):

Fiction

Nonfiction

Supplementary Materials:

Preparation:

Adaptation of content

Links to background

Links to past learning

Strategies incorporated

Scaffolding:

Comprehensible input

Group Options:

Whole class

Integration of Processes:

Speaking

Listening

Application:

Meaningful

Linked to objectives

Promotes engagement

Assessment:

Group

Oral

Lesson Sequence:

Transition:

Students will review the difference between fiction and nonfiction.

Anticipatory Set:

Briefly summarize “Balloons Over Broadway,” a book from last week that is nonfiction.

Instruction/Check for Understanding:

Read “Milly and the Macy’s Parade.” Point out the difference between a book that features facts and one that emphasizes emotion and plot.

Review the rules for being good audience members (sitting still, not talking).

Show “Inside Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade.” (Note for teachers: One of the things I especially like about the DVD is that it features Tony Sarg, the subject of the biography, “Balloons Over Broadway” and the Macy’s employees who helped to create the first parade, many of whom were recent immigrants to the US, which is an important plot element in “Milly and the Macy’s Parade.”)

Closure/Summary:

Discuss whether the film is fiction or nonfiction and how students came to their conclusions.

Week 11: Fiction or Nonfiction? Looking for details to make decisions

November15

Grade/Teacher:

  • 1st, 2nd and 3rd Grades/Harrison

Unit/Theme:

  • Fiction/Nonfiction, Looking for details to make decisions

Standards:

  • 3.W.6

  • “With guidance and support from adults, use technology to produce and publish writing (using keyboarding skills) as well as to interact and collaborate with others.”

Lesson Objective(s):

  • Students will use details to identify fiction and nonfiction books

  • Students will listen for details to successfully play the online game

Language Objective(s):

  • Students will confidently use the terms fiction and nonfiction to describe reading materials.

Key Vocabulary:

  • Review: Fiction, Nonfiction

Materials:

Materials

Computer lab

Site for game: http://www.abcya.com/kids_typing_game.htm

Readings:

Preparation:

  • Adaptation of content

  • Links to background

  • Links to past learning

  • Strategies incorporated

Scaffolding:

  • Modeling

  • Guided practice

  • Independent practice

  • Comprehensible input

Group Options:

  • Whole class

  • Independent

Integration of Processes:

  • Reading

  • Speaking

  • Listening

Application:

  • Hands-on

  • Meaningful

  • Linked to objectives

  • Promotes engagement

Assessment:

  • Individual

  • Group

  • Oral

Transition:

Anticipatory Set:

  • Show the book “Balloons Over Broadway.”  Ask students to predict whether the book is fiction or nonfiction.

  • Show “The True Story of the Three Little Pigs.” Ask  students to predict whether the book is fiction or nonfiction.

  • Read the books to the class (“Balloons” is available as an ebook, which makes it more interesting as a read aloud)

Instruction/Check for Understanding:

  • Review predictions and the details that led to successful predictions.

  • Show the website for the game, “Alpha Munchies Typing Game”   http://www.abcya.com/kids_typing_game.htm

    • What clues does the title of the game give for playing it successfully?

Closure/Summary:

  • Observe students as they work on the game

Preview for Next Week:

  • Tell students we will watch Thanksgiving videos next week.

Tuesday, October 29, 2013

October29

Library Information Skills 10-29-13

by posted under Lesson Plan | 2 Comments »    
« Older Entries