Madame Pince and the School Library

For libraries and librarians just west of Hogwarts

Christmas videos for lower elementary

December13

Week 14

Subject/Grade(s)

  • Lesson Plans: Information Skills, Grades K-3

Unit/Theme:

What is media?/Christmas

Standards:

AASL 4.1.3

Content Objective:

Students will respond to literature and creative expressions of ideas in various formats and genres.

Language Objectives/Students will:

  • Express feelings about characters and events in a story
  • Make connections between stories and their own experiences

Materials (Videos):

  • For Kindergarten:
  • Dr. Seuss’ How the Grinch Stole Christmas and Horton Hears a Who! (My copy) Selection: “How the Grinch Stole Christmas.”
  • For 1st Grade:
    The Twelve Days of Christmas … and more classic holiday stories (My copy) Selections: “The Twelve Days of Christmas,” “Merry Christmas, Space Case” and “Sam and the Lucky Money.”
  • For 2nd Grade:
    “Merry Madagascar” (My copy) Selection: Title story
  • For 3rd Grade:
    “The Magic School Bus Holiday Special” (My copy) Selection: “Holiday Special”

Key Vocabulary (Review and New):

  • Review: Media, Video, VHS tape, DVD

Preparation:

  • Links to background
  • Links to past learning
  • Strategies incorporated

Scaffolding:

  • Modeling
  • Guided practice

Group Options:

  • Whole class

Integration of Processes:

  • Speaking
  • Listening

Application:

  • Meaningful
  • Linked to objectives
  • Promotes engagement

Assessment:

  • Group

Anticipatory Set:

  • Review the what students remember about the words “media,” “video,” “VHS tape” and “DVD.” Discuss how they are used in students’ homes and the differences in the technologies (i.e., why are people switching from VHS tapes to DVDs?
  • Review parallels between the Daily 5 concept, ipick, and choices students make when watching movies (specifically comprehension and subject preference)

Lesson:

  • Review “audience ettiquette” (no talking, sitting still) when watching a movie or attending an assembly
  • Shows video/DVD listed above for each grade
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Christmas Books for Lower Elementary; Locating Materials in the Media Center

November29

Computer Lab supplement:

Teachers are commenting on the increased use of tablets by students and their difficulty using a mouse to navigate their cursor on a traditional monitor.  To address that, students will practice their mouse skills by playing the games listed on this page of my computer blog for students:

http://iblog.dearbornschools.org/harrisc1/2014/11/28/happy-grinch-mas-day

Week 13, First week of December

Grade/Class/Subject:

  • Media Skills, K – 3rd Grade

Unit/Theme:

  • Christmas books/Locating materials in the media center

Standards:

Lesson Objective(s):

  • Students will respond to lterature and creative expressions of ideas in various formats and genres

Language Objective(s):

  • Students will express feelings about characters and events in a story.
  • Students will make connections between literature and their own experiences.

Key Vocabulary:

  • Review: Spine label, alphabet, Christmas, Holiday
  • New: Alphabetizing

Materials:

    • Nelson, S., Rollins, J. & Chowdrey, R. (2004). Frosty the Snowman. New York: Scholastic.

Preparation:

  • Links to background
  • Links to past learning
  • Strategies incorporated

Scaffolding:

  • Modeling
  • Guided practice

Group Options:

  • Whole class

Integration of Processes:

  • Reading
  • Speaking
  • Listening

Application:

  • Meaningful
  • Linked to objectives
  • Promotes engagement

Assessment:

  • Group
  • Written

Transition:

  • Review the Key Vocabulary words above and introduce “Alphabetizing.”

Anticipatory Set:

  • Review what students remember about the organization of books.
  • Review elements of the cover and title page.
  • Review what students remember about the organization of the media center.
  • Review why students use browsing sticks.
  • Point out the letters on the spines of the books and the Christmas sticker.

Instruction/Check for Understanding:

  • Read “How the Grinch stole Christmas” and interject questions to promote listening and interacting with the text.

If there’s time:

  • Read/sing “Frosty the Snowman” and/or ” Here Comes Santa Claus”

Preview for Next Week:

  • Tell students we will read more Christmas books next week.
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Fiction/Nonfiction, Thanksgiving Books for Lower Elementary

November1

Week 10 November 11, 2013 PowerPoint

adapted from Flagler’s School’s Focus Skills Fiction/Nonfiction PowerPoint (retrieved November 9, 2013)

Subject/Grade/Teacher:

  • Media/Kindergarten, 1st, 2nd, 3rd Grades

Unit/Theme:

  • Nonfiction/Fiction/Thanksgiving

Standards:

  • AASL 4.1.3

Lesson Objective(s):

  • Students will respond to literature and creative expressions of ideas in various formats and genres.

Language Objective(s):

  • Express feelings about characters and events in a story.
  • Make connections between literature and their own experiences.

Key Vocabulary:

  • Review: Nonfiction, fiction

Materials:

Preparation:

  • Links to background
  • Links to past learning
  • Strategies incorporated

Scaffolding:

  • Modeling
  • Guided practice

Group Options:

  • Whole class

Integration of Processes:

  • Reading
  • Speaking
  • Listening

Application:

  • Hands-on
  • Meaningful
  • Linked to objectives
  • Promotes engagement

Assessment:

  • Group
  • Oral

Transition:

  • Open the Fiction/Nonfiction PowerPoint Presentation on the Promethean board.
  • Review what students know about the two words.

Anticipatory Set:

  • Go through the slides of the presentation including the questions to help students discern the difference between fiction and nonfiction.

Instruction/Check for Understanding:

  • Show the cover of the book, “Arthur’s Thanksgiving,” and review elements of the cover (title, author, etc.).
  • Point out the connections between the title and the cover illustration.
  • Ask students to predict the story using the cover. Expand to predictions about the story using their prior knowledge of the “Arthur” series.
  • Read the book. Review predictions afterwards and gauge accuracy.
  • Show the cover of the book, “Thank you , Sarah.”  Ask students to predict whether the story is fiction or nonfiction.  (Younger children will often predict it is fiction because the illustrations are humorous drawings.)
  • Read the book .

If there’s time:

  • Read “Alfred’s Nose!” or “I Know An Old Lady Who Swallowed A Pie.”

Closure/Summary:

  • Review predictions.

Transition to the computers:

  • Use the Promethean Board to demonstrate the change in the desktop with the icon for my school blog (Mrs. Harrison’s Blog at http://iblog.dearbornschools.org/harrisc1/. )
  • Show how students click on the icon and the hyperlink in the blog to go to the site for today.

Preview for Next Week:

  • Tell students we will continue reading Thanksgiving books next week.
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Fiction or Nonfiction for Lower Elementary

October25

Grade/Teacher:

  • Media Skills, Kindergarten through 3rd Grade, Week 9

Unit/Theme:

  • Fiction/Nonfiction/Thanksgiving

Standards (AASL):

  • Learners use skills, resources and tools to read, view and listen for information presented in any format (e.g., textual, visual, media, digital) in order to make inferences and gather meaning. (1.1.6)
Read, view, and
listen for information
presented in any
format (e.g., textual,
visual, media, digital)
in order to make
inferences and
gather meaning.Read, view, andLearners will use skills, resources, and tools to display initiative and engagement by posing questions and investigating the answers beyond the collection of superficial facts. (1.2.1)

Lesson Objective(s):

  • Students will use clues from the book (spine label, cover illustrations, title, etc.) to determine if a book is nonfiction or fiction.

Language Objective(s):

  • Students will use the terms, fiction and nonfiction, correctly.

Key Vocabulary:

  • Review: spine label
  • New: fiction, nonfiction

Materials:

Preparation:

  • Links to background
  • Links to past learning
  • Strategies incorporated

Scaffolding:

  • Modeling
  • Guided practice

Group Options:

  • Whole class

Integration of Processes:

  • Reading
  • Speaking
  • Listening

Application:

  • Meaningful
  • Linked to objectives
  • Promotes engagement

Assessment:

  • Group

Transition:

  • Review where a spine label is found and what it’s for.

Anticipatory Set:

  • Write the words “fiction” and “nonfiction” on the board, explain their definitions.

Instruction/Check for Understanding:

  • Show the cover of the book “Twas the night before Thanksgiving” and review elements of the cover (title, author, etc.).  Point out the spine label and genre stickers.
  • What predictions can they make about the book by using the information that’s on the front cover and spine?  Is it fiction or nonfiction?
  • Have Wegman’s version of the Clement Moore poem available to talk about patterns.  If students know Moore’s poem, what can they predict about Pilkey’s book?
  • Read “Twas the night before Thanksgiving.”  Afterwards, review predictions and gauge accuracies.
  • Show cover the front cover and spine label of the book “The Pilgrims of Plymouth.”  Can students predict whether the books is fiction or nonfiction?  How are the illustrations different from the first book?

If there’s time:

Closure/Summary:

  • Review the difference between fiction and nonfiction.
  • Ask students why it’s important to know the difference when they come to the media center to choose books.

Preview for Next Week:

  • Tell students we will read more Thanksgiving books next week.
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Halloween Week 2: Picture Books and Computer Skills

October23

For traditional plans using the media center and Halloween picture books, click here. 

Grade/Teacher:

  • Harrison/Media Skills/1st, 2nd and 3rd

  • Week 8, October 24

Unit/Theme:

  • Halloween/Harrison/Media Skills

Standards:

American Association of School Librarians, “Standards for the 21st Century Learner” 

Learners Use Tools, Resources, & Skills to:

  • 2, Draw conclusions, make informed decisions, apply knowledge to new situations, and create new knowlege.

  • 4, Pursue personal and aesthetic growth

Scope and Sequence:

Dearborn Public Schools Department of Media Services, K-12 Information Literacy Media Curriculum, 2004:

  • Content Standard 2: “A student who has been educated in library media information skills evaluates information critically and competently.” (Page 7, Dearborn Public Schools Department of Media Services, K-12 Information Literacy Library Media Curriculum, June 2004)

Common Core State Standards:

  • CC.4.R.I.1 Key Ideas and Details: Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.

  • CC.1.R.L.5 Craft and Structure: Explain major differences between books that tell stories and books that give information, drawing on a wide reading of a range of text types.

Lesson Objective(s):

  • Students will evaluate picture books based on theme and characterization using the district’s model, ‘The Daily 5.”

  • Students will practice logging into the computer, accessing the blog and, using mouse and typing skills, play the games suggested.

Key Vocabulary (review):

  • Rhyme

  • Rhyming words

Materials:

Preparation:

  • Adaptation of content

  • Links to background

  • Links to past learning

  • Strategies incorporated

Scaffolding:

  • Modeling

  • Guided practice

  • Independent practice

  • Comprehensible input

Group Options:

  • Whole class

  • Partners

  • Independent

Integration of Processes:

  • Reading

  • Writing/Typing

  • Speaking

  • Listening

Application:

  • Meaningful

  • Hands-on

  • Linked to objectives

  • Promotes engagement

Assessment:

  • Individual

  • Group

  • Oral

Transition:

  • Show the key vocabulary words for today and review their meanings, cover examples of rhyming pairs.

Anticipatory Set:

  • Show the front covers of the books above.

  • Indicate the elements of print: author, illustrator, title, etc.

  • Can students predict whether the text will be rhyming in any of them?  What clues can be used?  (Possible answers may center around having previously read the books or knowing about books in the series, i.e., “Arthur” and “I Know an Old Lady Who…”)

  • Review what students know about “good fit” books and how they make selections in the media center.

Instruction/Check for Understanding:

  • Read one or two of the books listed and point other whether they are rhyming or not.

  • After reading, review students’ rhyming predictions and their accuracy.

  • Pull up the blog on the teacher’s station and use the promethean board to direct students to the latest post.

  • Demonstrate how students will access the sites to practice using their mice (mouses?) and typing skills

  • Pass out cards with students’ IDs and tell students to hold on to them because they will be collected as students demonstrate their ability to control their mouse.

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Library Media Center Orientation, Elementary Students

September4

Title of the Lesson/Activity:         

Library media center orientation

Grade Level:

1st, 2nd and 3rd grades

Overview:                                         

Students in first grade will be introduced to the media center organization, staff, rules and procedures.  Students in 2nd and 3rd Grade will review procedures from last year.         

Central Question/ Problem:         

How can I find books that I will like to read?

Learning Objectives:                     

Students will identify patterns in the location of materials, procedures for browsing in the media center and checking books out. 

Assessment Tools:

Students will find books to check out for their use and return books that they don’t want to borrow to their appropriate place on the shelves by using sticks.

Key Concepts:                                                         

DPS Content Interpretation: Students who are becoming information literate locate the Fiction and Nonfiction collections and know how materials are arranged on shelves.

Evidence/ Sources:                                    

  • Media center
  • Circulation computer with Destiny software
  • Shelf markers (a.k.a. “Sticks”)
  • Class lists with student barcode numbers in place of library cards
  • Bookmarks
  • Picture book, “Never Let a Ghost Borrow Your Library Book”

Duration:                                                                               

45 minute class review to be conducted weekly until the majority of students are browsing and checking out books independently.

Key Vocabulary:

  • Library
  • Librarian
  • Media Center
  • Media Specialist
  • Media Secretary

Instructional Sequence:                            

Transition:

  • Write the key vocabulary words on the board and introduce or review them with students.
  • Explore connections students make to the words.
  • Show the cover of the picture books to be read.
  • Discussion: What does “book care” mean (from the subtitle of the book)?

Anticipatory Set:

  • Explain that students will begin checking out books from the media center soon and that Mrs. Malyn, the media secretary, is scheduling their classes.
  • Review/explain rules for borrowing books: Students in 2-5 grade can borrow two books each week, as long as they bring their old books back;  1st graders get one book.
  • Review/explain elements of book care (water damage, food damage, using a bookmark, keeping books in safe place they’ll remember – brainstorm ideas of good places at home and in their class)
  • Review/explain fine policy: no charge for late books, but there is a charge to repair or replace books which needs to be paid before new books can be borrowed
  • Review/explain “browsing” concept (check out time is limited-how to pick a good book based on cover clues and book location in media center)

Instruction/Check for Understanding:

  • Read “Never Let a Ghost Borrow Your Library Book.”  How can the title and cover help students when browsing to determine if they might like to read the book?
  • Before reading, introduce/review elements of print (title, author, etc.) Point out connections between the title and the cover illustrations.  What can students predict about the story they will hear by using the title and the illustration as clues.
  • Read the book.  Review predictions afterwards.
  • Demonstrate how to use the shelf markers when browsing for books.  Pass out 5 and tell students to give their shelf marker to another student when they have chosen their book(s) for check out.

Closure/Summary:

  • Pass out a book mark to each student and stress the similarities between a bookmark and a shelfmarker.  How are they similar and different?
  • In the last 5 minutes of class, introduce students to the “ABC Line Up Game.”
  • Students line up to leave the library in alphabetical order by their names, like books on the shelves.  And, like books on the shelves, they make no noise.
  • To communicate, students can use gestures.  Strikes are given for each time a student speaks.
  • The class with the fewest number of strikes when lining up wins for the week’s game.

Anticipated student conceptions or challenges to understanding:            

Explain the anticipated challenges students might face in accomplishing these objectives and tips to overcome them

Curriculum Links:

AASL Content Standard #1: A student who has been educated in library media information skills accesses information efficiently and effectively.

Common Core State Standards:

1.1.1 Follow an inquiry-based process in seeking knowledge in curricular subjects and make the real world connection for using this process in own life.

Bibliography:

Casale, Karen, and Cecilia Rebora. Never let a ghost borrow your library book: book care guidelines from the Library Secret Service. Madison, WI: UpstartBooks, 2012. Print.

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OPACs, Baseball and Fiction Books

April14


Week29 Baseball Fiction using the computer lab

Click on the link above for an alternate lesson plan for Week 29 which features a new book,

The Bambino and Me

and tie-ins with a computer lab.

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St. Patrick’s Day and Using the OPAC to Find Holiday Books

March5

Week 27

Click here to find my lesson plan that incorporates two books by Tomie dePaola with a lesson on using the library’s OPAC and its Visual Search function to find Holiday books.

The two books I use are:

DePaola, Tomie. Jamie O’Rourke and the big potato: an Irish folktale. New York: Putnam, 1992. Print.

DePaola, Tomie. Jamie O’Rourke and the pooka. New York: Putnam, 2000. Print.

If you’d like to use a more traditional lesson plan for St Pat’s day, here’s the one I wrote in 2011.

 

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Supporting the Scholastic Book Fair

March3

Plans for the Week of September 8, 2014

Click here to download the lesson plans for this week, which have been written to support the Scholastic Book Fair scheduled in my elementary school. 

One of the things kids seem to have the most trouble with is determining what they can buy at the Book Fair, so my lessons always include a math element.  Following are two worksheets I found on the internet, if you’d like to have a written element to the lesson.  I’ve also found that most of a 45 minute class will be taken up with the DVD, a short read aloud selected from the books being sold, and reviewing where to find the price of each book or item.

working with coins

identify_coins-2

 

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Review of OPACs and Dr. Seuss’s Birthday (Week 25)

February26

The lesson plans in the document below are for Week 24, March 3, 2014.  Classes are continuing in the computer lab using their computers to access the library’s OPAC.

You can access the Google Document version of my lesson plans, click here. 

So far, the kids in 1st, 2nd and 3rd Grade are doing well with accessing the OPAC.  What I’ve noticed is that there’s a disconnect between the Call # in the record and the location of the book on the shelves.  I’ll be focusing on that skill this week.

Because March 2 is Dr. Seuss’s birthday, I’ll use Dr. Seuss books this week:

For a more traditional lesson plan using these books, try this one from 2011

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Using OPACs

February24

One thing I’ve not cared for with Edublogs is the way that postings print.  I’ve decided to use Google Docs for my lesson plans.  Click on the link below to go to a SIOP version of the weeks plan, which focuses on using the computer lab to reinforce logging into computers and databases and searching databases for information.  Since I’m new to Google Docs, please let me know if you have problems accessing the document.

WEEK 23: Using OPACs (review and an added search step) Click here for the lesson plan using Google Docs Documents

Materials needed:

  • class set of computers
  • Promethean or other Smart Board to model steps to access the OPAC
  • Google Presentation Document with Key Vocabulary and the day’s assignment 
  • Copy of the books to be read today:



 

 

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Reflecting on “Arthur’s Best School Days”

February12

I’ve been showing “Arthur’s Best School Days”  as a Valentine’s Day reward for several years.  The first episode is “Arthur and the Square Dance.”  Arthur and Francine’s friends are certain that they are in love with each other.  It works well with lower elementary kids and their cooties fear.

This year, I let the DVD run through until the last episode, “Buster Hits the Books,” which ended up being the one that kids responded to most.  Buster has been watching movies and writing about them when he needs to write a book report for school.  Buster doesn’t like reading and can’t make it through the books that his friends recommend.  They keep dumbing down their suggestions until he’s left with a boring picture book.  But he’s also borrowed Arthur’s copy of Robin Hood, which Arthur tells him he might be able to read with some practice.  As it happens, Buster nearly finishes Robin Hood in one night because he loves the plot.  It turns out, he can read but he’s been bored by the books he’s gotten in the past.

After showing the DVD, classes and I discussed what to look for when they come to the media center and select their books.  I told them I have books in my house that I thought I would like, but once I started reading them, I discovered I didn’t care for them.  Those poor big eyed kids.  I told them everyone was like Buster: there are books for each of us that we won’t want to read and it’s important to pick subjects that we like when we have the option.   I don’t think they’ve heard that enough.  This is especially sad when, as educators, we know that reading comprehension scores increase when students read subjects they find interesting.

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Introduction to Keyboarding in the Library Media Center

November22

Grade/Teacher:

  • 1st – 3rd/Harrison

Unit/Theme:

  • Keyboarding

Standards:

  • (CCSS Speaking and Listening, all grades) Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about grade 1 topics and texts with peers and adults in small and larger groups.

  • (CCSS Writing, grade 3) With guidance and support from adults, use technology to produce and publish writing (using keyboarding skills) as well as to interact and collaborate with others.

Lesson Objective(s):

  • Students will be introduced to basic keyboarding terms and skills.

Language Objective(s):

  • Students’ listening and speaking skills will be reinforced.

  • Students will correctly use the terms introduced today.

Key Vocabulary:

  • Keyboarding (Keys are the things you touch to make letters.  They are arranged on a board. This is a “keyboard” and when you use it, you are “keyboarding.”)
  • Touch typing (Typing is another term for “keyboarding.”  Notice it is called “touch typing” not “pound typing.”)
  • ID (Short for “identification.”  When you type this in you are “identifying” yourself on the computer.)
  • Password (Passwords prove that you are really who you say you are.  They keep you and your information safe.) 

Materials:

Preparation:

  • Adaptation of content

  • Links to background

  • Links to past learning

  • Strategies incorporated

Scaffolding:

  • Modeling

  • Guided practice

  • Independent practice

  • Comprehensible input

Group Options:

  • Whole class

  • Independent

Integration of Processes:

  • Reading

  • Writing

  • Speaking

  • Listening

Application:

  • Hands-on

  • Meaningful

  • Linked to objectives

  • Promotes engagement

Assessment:

  • Individual

  • Group

  • Written

  • Oral

Transition:

  • Put the key vocabulary words on the board 
  • Ask students if they are familiar with any of them or know what they mean
  • Ask students to break down the words/terms for any clues about their meaning
  • Ask students who are familiar with the words/terms when they would use them

Anticipatory Set:

Tell students that we will be moving to a new unit today and that the terms are important but first we’ll read about a family that uses words and expressions in very interesting ways.

Instruction/Check for Understanding:

  • Read “The Dumb Bunnies’ Easter” and point out when the Bunnies literally use a term or word.
  • Use the Promethean Board to show students how to access the Typing Web (http://www.typingweb.com/tutor) program from the blog.  Note, this URL is for student logins and is different from the portal for teachers)
  • Show students how to log in with their student number and password (the PW is different from their computer login; reinforce that they should NOT click on the box to save their information) 
  • Show students the list of Beginner exercises that comes up after logging.  
  • Tell students to click on the first one, “The Home Row Keys.” 
  • Point out the pattern of the letters and the need to hit the “enter” or “return” key at the end of the first line.  Also, when a wrong key is hit, the cursor doesn’t advance until you type the right letter.  Also point out the need to hit the space bar to move the cursor through the blank space.
  • Tell students that speed is not important now, it’s more important to type the right keys.  Students should try to have a 50% accuracy rating.  Let students know that their scores are saved in their record. 

Closure/Summary:

  • Five minutes before the end of class, have students report their experiences.

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Movies Are Fiction Or Nonfiction, Too

November21

Week 12, November 26, 2013

Grade/Class/Subject:

1-3/Harrison/Media Skills

Unit/Theme:

Fiction or Nonfiction/Media

Standards (AASL):

AASL 4.1.3

Content Objectives (Dearborn Public Schools Department of Media Services, K-12 Information Literacy Media Curriculum, 2004):

Students will respond to literature and creative expressions of ideas in various formats and genres.

Common Core Standards:

Speaking & Listening/Comprehension and Collaboration (SL.1 and SL.3 for grades 1-3)

Key Vocabulary (Review):

Fiction

Nonfiction

Supplementary Materials:

Preparation:

Adaptation of content

Links to background

Links to past learning

Strategies incorporated

Scaffolding:

Comprehensible input

Group Options:

Whole class

Integration of Processes:

Speaking

Listening

Application:

Meaningful

Linked to objectives

Promotes engagement

Assessment:

Group

Oral

Lesson Sequence:

Transition:

Students will review the difference between fiction and nonfiction.

Anticipatory Set:

Briefly summarize “Balloons Over Broadway,” a book from last week that is nonfiction.

Instruction/Check for Understanding:

Read “Milly and the Macy’s Parade.” Point out the difference between a book that features facts and one that emphasizes emotion and plot.

Review the rules for being good audience members (sitting still, not talking).

Show “Inside Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade.” (Note for teachers: One of the things I especially like about the DVD is that it features Tony Sarg, the subject of the biography, “Balloons Over Broadway” and the Macy’s employees who helped to create the first parade, many of whom were recent immigrants to the US, which is an important plot element in “Milly and the Macy’s Parade.”)

Closure/Summary:

Discuss whether the film is fiction or nonfiction and how students came to their conclusions.

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